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Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
it makes me think what is going on in arizona and alabama and washington and texas, because it is happening everywhere. tavis: we obviously did not plan this, i did not buy you have worked on the set days ago. you were at one of the superfund sites in this extreme heat. i was in north carolina with 105 degree temperatures every day. the conversation with this heat wave could be more -- could not be more auspicious. >> sometimes -- most of the time we can take water for granted that it is always there, especially in a heatwave. that is something we gravitate to for everything. sprinklers, swimming, a cooling off, putting out the fires. tavis: how baht -- how bad is the water crisis? ande're in a water crisis it can be a daunting look at the situation we're in with the misuse, the lack of, the overuse, and the pollution of our water in the united states. we do not think it is us. but like i said in the film, it already is you. it can see these scenarios played themselves out in other countries and we always go there to aid in rescue what we have that same problem right here. as in the film, t
merrow reports on a texas school district's approach to its high school drop-out crisis: luring students back with college courses. >> what we're looking at doing is doing education in a different way, where the colleges come together with us and start working with these young people while they're still in high school. >> suarez: judy woodruff looks back at the major decisions in this high-impact supreme court term with historian michael beschloss and marcia coyle of the "national law journal." >> ifill: and on this most american of holidays, we turn to the men who signed the declaration of independence and what happened to them after they did. >> they were placed under house arrest. they had-- they were allowed to write letters home. they were visited by physicians. no one was ever tortured. that's something i have seen over the years and it is wrong. every time i see it, i shudder. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing
my other journalism. it is also -- i shined a light on odessa, texas, in "friday night lights," and i shined a light on myself with the same standards. i feel if you are going to write -- if you want to call it a memoir, that is fine. it is a personal story. you have to be honest. i mean, honesty, i guess, is brutal. otherwise, what's the point? i have read memoirs and i have to tell you, i feel a lot of them are kind of jiggered here and jiggered there, and everything turns out happily in the end. i didn't want to do that, but i knew that some people would say, whoa, whoa, you are really going deep here, and he's a defenseless little boy. but i wanted to know how much he knew about himself, and i did want to tell him. tavis: when you shined that light on odessa, texas, there are things about itself -- that is to say, the town - >> yes. tavis: things that odessa had to face about itself that it might not have liked so much. >> yes, that is true. tavis: that is an understatement, of course. >> [laughs] i think that is true. tavis: when buzz shines the light on himself on friday or any
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)